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  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 1)

     

    This information is NOT legal advice, and is only provided as a guide. If you require case specific information please contact Police Firearms Licensing Branch directly on 1300 171 011.

     

    Before you start your application, please read this information carefully. This will help you to have everything ready before you start.

    To apply for a weapons licence in Queensland you must:

    1. Meet the personal eligibility requirements
    2. Have a genuine reason to hold a licence
    3. Have access to secure weapon storage
    4. Complete an approved weapons safety course covering the category of weapon you’re applying for and provide your statement of attainment. The course must have been completed within the 12 months before the date of submitting your application.
    5. Provide the supporting documentation requested during the application process (learn more below)
    6. Provide a passport-quality digital image of your head and shoulders against a plain background. This image will be printed on your licence card if your application is approved.
    7. Pay the required fees (learn more below)
    8. Attend a Queensland police station with 100 points of identification when you are advised by Weapons Licensing. You will be advised in writing.

     

    How to Apply for a Gun Licence 

    The first thing is to be prepared. New licences require a passport quality photograph and supporting documentation, such as proof that you’ve completed a firearms safety training course within the last 12 months. The documents you need to supply may be different depending on the type of licence you need. Find out what documents you’ll need for your particular application.

    You will also have to pay a fee for your gun licence.

     

    Watch our video guide to applying for a gun licence.

     

     

    Who Can Apply for a Fireams Licence in Queensland

    To get a gun licence you must:

    • be over the age of 18
    • have successfully completed an appropriate firearms safety training course during the previous year
    • have secure storage for your guns
    • have a legitimate reason for owning the gun such as being a member of a gun club or a collector—you may have to provide proof to support your reason
    • be a ‘fit and proper person’—this takes into consideration your criminal record and potential health issues.

    If you’re aged between 11 and 17, you can apply for a minor’s licence.

     

    Apply online for a Weapons Licence for Firearms in Queensland

    You can apply for a weapons licence online. You can either upload and attach the necessary documentation or send them separately by post.

    You can pay using credit/debit Mastercard or Visa.

     

    Apply at your local police station

    You can also apply for a licence using a paper application form. You will need to complete the form and take it to your local police station with the required documentation and payment.

     

    Permit to Acquire a Weapon

    Once you either have or have applied for a weapons’ licence, you can apply for a permit to acquire (PTA) a weapon.

    You must be over 18 years of age to apply for a permit to acquire, so a ‘Minors’ firearms licence is not accepted for PTA applications. Minors are not allowed to buy weapons in Queensland.

    As with a gun licence, you can either apply for a permit to acquire a weapon online or at your local police station using the the paper form (PDF, 935KB).

    There is a mandatory waiting period for a PTA of 28 days from the date the application is lodged.

     

    Changing your Address on a Weapons Licence

    If you have a weapons’ licence, you need to let the police know if you change your home or weapons storage address within 14 days of the change.

    You can do this using the online change of address form if you have a current email address. Otherwise, you can complete the paper change of address form (PDF, 801KB) and take it to your local police station.

     

    Renewing, surrendering, amending or cancelling your Weapons licence in Queensland

    You can register new weapons to your licence but you may have to pay a one-off fee for each firearm.

    You need to let the police know if your circumstances change (e.g. you change your name or address) within 14 days of the change.

    Find out who to contact if your circumstances change, you lose your licence, or you need to renew, give up or cancel your licence.

     

    Further information

    Read more about:

     

    Next Article

     

  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 10)

     

    Gun Safes - Safe Storage of Firearms and Ammunition

     

    Storage Generally

    Number of weapons

    Weapon categories

    Required weapon state

    Required storage facility

    30 or fewer

    (or any number of weapons for a miscellaneous licence)

    A, B, C, E & M

    Unloaded, with the bolt removed or the action broken

    In a locked container constructed of solid steel or solid timber, and securely fixed to the frame or floor of a permanent building if the container weighs less than 150kg.

    Container must be kept locked with a sturdy combination lock, keyed lock or keyed padlock.

    30 or fewer

    (For a collector's licence, only permanently inoperable category H.

    See row 4 for temporarily inoperable category H weapons, regardless of number)

    D, H & R

    (including temporarily inoperable Cat H)

    Unloaded, with the bolt removed or the action broken

    In a solid steel container, bolted to the frame or floor of a permanent building.

    Container must be kept locked with a sturdy combination lock, keyed lock or keyed padlock.

    More than 30A, B & C

    Unloaded, with the bolt removed or the action broken

    Either:

    In a locked container (as per requirements in row 1), or a locked gun rack, in a locked storeroom;

    or

    In a locked vault.

    More than 30

    D, H & R

    Unloaded, with the bolt removed or the action broken

    Either:

    In a locked container (as per requirements in row 2), or a locked gun rack, in a locked storeroom;

    or

    In a locked vault.

     

    Dealers/Armourers/Theatrical Ordnance Suppliers

    The storage requirements for these types of licences are at a higher level than that of a firearms licence holder, due to the ability of the licensee to possess and trade in high risk and larger number of weapons. These sections outline specific requirements for:

    • how weapons may be stored
    • floors
    • walls
    • ceiling
    • external doors
    • grills for windows and shopfront doors
    • burglar alarms; and
    • vaults and safes; and general requirements for gun racks.

    Contact Weapons Licensing to arrange an inspection of premises. If establishing new premises or modifying existing premises, it is recommended that contact is made with Weapons Licensing before beginning construction or purchase, to ensure the premises are compliant with the relevant sections of the Weapons Regulation 2016.

    Refer to sections 78 - 87 of the Weapons Regulation 2016 for more information.

     

    Security Organisations

    Section 75 of the Weapons Regulation 2016 states that an organisation that holds a 'security licence - organisation' must take reasonable precautions to ensure that weapons under the licence are not accessible to a person other than an endorsed representative or an employee of the organisation who holds a 'security licence (guard)' or 'firearms licence (instructor)'. 

    To ensure the secure storage of weapons registered to your licence Weapons Regulation 2016 also outlines the legislative requirements regarding:

    • vaults
    • vault doors, and
    • safes. 

     

    Storage away from a Secure Storage Facility

    Sometimes you may not have access to your normal storage facility but you are still required to store your weapons appropriately.  This means storing your weapons unloaded in:

    • a securely closed container with the bolt removed or with a trigger lock fitted, or
    • a locked container.​​

    The container must be either:

    • out of sight in a locked room of a permanent building, or
    • locked in the boot of a vehicle, or
    • out of sight, locked in a vehicle that does not have a boot.

    This does not replace your usual secure storage facility .

    Weapons must be kept unloaded at all times unless being used. For example, the weapon must be unloaded during transport to a range, and at the range when it’s not being used in actual competition.

     

    Storage in or on Vehicles

    As a general rule, you should not store any weapons in a vehicle. Loose firearms in a vehicle are a prime target for thieves.

    In some situations, you may need to store a weapon in a vehicle, in these circumstances ensure that:

    1. If the vehicle has a lockable boot, the weapon is locked in the boot; otherwise:

    (a) the weapon is locked in a metal container fixed to the vehicle; or
    (b) the weapon is in a securely closed container that is out of sight in the 
         vehicle.

    2. The metal container and anything on or attached to it, must not suggest that a 
        weapon is inside.

    3. A person in control of a weapon (whether or not the person has custody of it) must 
        ensure the weapon is not left in an unlocked vehicle if the vehicle is not being 
        attended by someone licensed to possess the weapon.

     

    Safe Storage of Ammunition

    If you bring you own ammunition into Queensland you must fulfil the requirements contained in the Explosives Act 1999 and the Explosives Regulation 2017.

    You require a licence or authority issued under the Weapons Act 1990 to possess ammunition. A dealer must be satisfied that if you are purchasing ammunition, you must be licences appropriately. The only way a dealer can be satisfied is to see the licence. 

    Schedule 2 of the Explosives Act 1999  defines ammunition as:

    • bombs
    • grenades
    • rockets
    • mines
    • projectiles and other similar devices 
    • all types of cartridges (including blanks) used in firearms.

    Schedule 7 of the Explosives Regulation 2017 defines small arms ammunition as :

    1. Ammunition for-
    • a shotgun; or
    • another firearm with a calibre of not more than 25.4mm; or 
    1. Primers (cap type) used for reloading the ammunition.

    You will comply with Section 48(1)(g) of the Explosives Regulation 2017  to possess small arms ammunition, if you are licensed under the Weapons Act 1990.

    Military ordnance is defined in the Military Dictionary as explosives, chemicals, pyrotechnics and similar stores. (e.g. bombs, guns and ammunition, flares, smoke or napalm). 

    The licensing of explosives and ammunition and their components including military ordnance is administered by the Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy.

    For more information see here, or call 13 25 23 during business hours. 

    The list of ammunition availability identifies a table containing ammunition that has been assessed and/or approved by the authorised officer as not commercially available.​

     

    Transporting Weapons and Ammunition on Aircraft

    Specific regulations apply to travelling by air with weapons and ammunition. ​​​Persons in possession of weapons and travelling between Queensland and other states/territories will be required to comply with Commonwealth legislation for the carriage of weapons and ammunition on aircraft.

    You will be required to obtain the permission of the owner or operator of the aircraft as provided for in section 23 of the Crimes (Aviation) Act 1991. Further, section 22D of the Air Navigation Act 1920 provides that competitors must ensure the weapon is not carried on board the aircraft. Generally, this means the weapon will be required to be stored in the hold of the aircraft, unloaded and in an appropriate storage container.

    Persons intending to carry ammunition on an aircraft can do so as long as they:

    • only carry up to 5kg of ammunition
    • obtain the permission of the airline company, and
    • the ammunition is boxed in the manufacturer’s packaging.

    If you intend to carry more than 5kg of ammunition per person, section 23 of the Civil Aviation Act 1988 provides that the permission of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority is also required

    For further information go to www.casa.gov.au.

     

    Public Display of Weapons

    ​The appropriate public display of historically significant and military weapons by RSL Sub Branches, historical societies, private museums and other organisations has strong and legitimate support across the community, within government and by legislation.

    Organisations wishing to lawfully possess and display firearms are required to satisfy specific licensing, registration and storage provisions under the Weapons Act 1990 and the Weapon Regulations 2016.

     

    Equivalent safe storage measures

    ​The authorised officer is able to approve safe storage measures equivalent to or of a higher standard than those required under this regulation in some circumstances.  If your storage differs from those set in the regulation, written approval is required from the authorised officer. 

    An application can be made in writing to an authorised officer to take a particular safety measure for the safe storage of weapons other than those listed above.  Your application should outline the measures being replaced with those proposed, indicating how these measures meet or exceed the safe storage requirements of those being replaced.

    The authorised officer must be satisfied that the proposed safety measures give at least the same level of safety and security as the replaced measures.  You should include all information about security at premises (i.e. alarms and locks), photos if available, contact telephone numbers and email addresses.

    This also applies to organisations wishing to apply for approval to take particular alternative safety measures to allow for the display of collectable firearms instead of measures required under the legislation.

    Refer to ​Section 98 of the Weapons Regulations 2016  for more information. 

     

    Third Party Storage & Safekeeping of Weapons in Queensland

     

    Can I Place my Firearms in Safekeeping?

    Your weapon/s can be held in safekeeping by a licensed weapons dealer or armourer for an indefinite period.

    Section 36 of the Weapons Act 1990 allows a person to possess a weapon on a temporary basis for a period not exceeding three months.  After the three month period, the licence holder safekeeping the weapons will be required to appropriately dispose of the weapon/s with the consent of the owner.

    The licence holder must ensure that they hold a licence for the category of weapon they are intending to safekeep. 

    An unregistered weapon cannot be held in safekeeping by a licence holder.  The weapon must first be registered.

    A dealer/armourer can safekeep both a registered weapon, and accept an unregistered weapon for registration.  The dealer will advise Weapons Licensing that the weapon is held at their premises for safekeeping.   

     

    What do I do after the 3 months Safekeeping Period Ends?

    The person safekeeping the weapons must with the consent of the owner:

    • Deliver the weapon to a licensed dealer for consignment sale or safekeeping, or

    • Surrender the weapon to your local police station, or

    • Return the weapon to the registered owner, if they hold a current licence, or

    • If the weapon is to be acquired by another licensed person, a permit to acquire (PTA) must be obtained for the weapon. The weapon cannot be put into safekeeping with another licence holder and must be disposed by one of the above methods until the PTA has been approved.

     

    Buying a Firearm that is in Safekeeping

    (i.e. the weapon is stored with a disposer who is not the registered owner)

     

    Buying a Firearm from a Licensed Individual

    If the person you are buying the weapon from is not the registered owner of the weapon a letter of authority is not required as the owner is required to sign the permit to acquire once it is issued. The registered owner's details will print on the PTA and they authorise the sale when they sign the PTA.

    If the registered owner will not be able to sign the permit to acquire, a letter of authority may be required, please contact Weapons Licensing.

    Should you require a letter of authorisation, it must confirm details of the weapon, permit the sale and disposal of the nominated weapon.

     

    Buying a Firearm from a Firearms Weapons Dealer

    If you are purchasing a weapon through a licensed weapons dealer check whether the weapon is being held by them in safekeeping or whether the registered owner has authorised them to sell it.

    If the weapon is being held in safekeeping then a letter of authority is required. The letter must be from the registered owner and must include details of the weapon and authorising the sale and disposal of the weapon by the licensed dealer.

    If the registered owner has given the licensed dealer authority to sell the weapon then a letter of authority is not required.

     

     

    Buying a Firearm that is in Safekeeping at a Police Station

    If you are acquiring a registered firearm from a police station then a letter of authority must be supplied. The letter must be from the registered owner and must include details of the weapon and authorising the sale and disposal of the weapon.

     

    This information is NOT legal advice, and is only provided as a guide. If you require case specific information please contact Police Firearms Licensing Branch directly on 1300 171 011.

    Next Article

     

     
  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 2)

     

    Applying for a permit to acquire (PTA) is the first step in acquiring a weapon. If you are acquiring the weapon from a licensed individual (who is not a weapons dealer), you must ensure the sale is brokered. A PTA authorises a weapons licence holder to buy or acquire a weapon. This assists QPS in tracking weapons movement and identifying the weapons registered to a licensee and where they are stored.

     

    1. Application

    A Permit to Acquire application must be made for each weapon you intend to acquire. Fees are payable for each application.

    • You can now submit and pay for a PTA application online.
    • Alternatively, an application for a permit to acquire (form 28) can be downloaded and then lodged and paid for at your local Queensland police station.  At the station you will need to provide details of your current weapons licence and show photographic identification.

     

    2. Waiting Period

    The mandatory waiting period for a PTA is 28 days from the date the application is lodged. Applicants who do not provide sufficient information or supporting documentation will experience delays in processing or possible rejection of the application.

     

    3. How will you be Advised

    If the application is successful, a PTA (Form 27) will be issued by Weapons Licensing and forwarded to you by mail. You can request to have your PTA faxed to a licensed weapons dealer. You will need to provide the dealer's name and fax number in writing to Weapons Licensing.

    If the application is not successful, you will be notified in writing.

     

    4. Permit to Acquire/Notice of Disposal – Form 27

    Form 27 is an approved and issued PTA, which is in two parts.  The top half of this form is your issued PTA and the bottom half is the notice of disposal. The expiry date will be nominated on the PTA. If you do not acquire the weapon before the PTA expires you will need to apply for a new PTA.

    Once you have received your PTA (form 27) you may purchase or acquire the weapon.

     

    5. Acquiring from a Licensed Weapons Dealer

    If you are acquiring the weapon from a licensed weapons Dealer they will sign the front of the notice of disposal. The dealer will then forward the completed form to Weapons Licensing. On receipt, Weapons Licensing will transfer the registration of the nominated weapon to your licence.

     

    6. Acquiring from a Licensed Individual

    If you are acquiring a weapon from a licensed individual, you are required to have the transaction brokered by a licensed weapons dealer. The transaction can be brokered by a Queensland police officer if the nearest licensed dealer is more than 100km from your usual place of residence.

    The weapons dealer or police officer will check the bottom section of the PTA and complete the licensed dealer/police certificate on the reverse side of the PTA. The dealer or police officer will then forward the completed form to Weapons Licensing. On receipt, Weapons Licensing will transfer the registration of the weapon to your licence.

    The disposer of the weapon is required to sign the notice of disposal. If for some reason the disposer is unable to sign the document, a statutory declaration outlining the reason must be attached to the form 27.

    Both the acquirer and disposer should sign the back of the PTA.

    If you fail to present the weapon with the PTA to a licensed weapons dealer (or a police officer) the transaction is not complete.  The firearm will not be registered to your licence. The PTA will expire and you will be unlawfully in possession of a firearm and at risk of prosecution.

     

    7. Registration of the Firearm to your Licence

    Once Weapons Licensing receives the completed notice of disposal, the weapon will be transferred from the disposer’s licence and registered to your licence.  It will then be reflected on your weapons list which Weapons Licensing will forward to you once the transaction has been finalised on the Commissioner’s firearms register.

     

    8. Modifying a PTA

    If you require modification to a PTA (i.e. you have changed your mind about the weapon to be acquired) you must return the original PTA to Weapons Licensing for modification.

     

    9. PTA Expires Before Acquiring a Weapon

    A PTA cannot be used to acquire a weapon once it has expired. Therefore, if a PTA expires before you have acquired a weapon the PTA will be unusable and should be returned to Weapons Licensing.  A PTA cannot be renewed and you will need to make a new application.

     

    10. Lost/Stolen/Destroyed PTAs

    If a PTA is lost, stolen or destroyed you must immediately report the matter to a police station and complete Form 3 - application for replacement licence - permit to acquire. On receipt of the Form 3, Weapons Licensing will issue a replacement.​

     

    11. Additional Requirements for Permits to Acquire

     

    Category A, B - sport or target shooting:

    • The make, model, type, calibre and action of the intended firearm/weapon
    • For category B only, provide the reason why the weapon is required and why the need cannot be satisfied in another way.

     

    Category C - sport or target shooting:

    • All details of the intended firearm/weapon; including serial number, make, model, type, calibre, action and magazine capacity
    • The reason why the weapon is required and why the need cannot be satisfied in another way.

     

    Category H - sport or target shooting:

    The make, model, type, calibre, action and barrel length of the intended firearm/weapon;
    A letter/certificate from your shooting club stating:

    • That you are a current member of the club
    • The type of firearm that is being acquired and is approved for use at their range of the club or an approved shooting club affiliated.


    If there are already two category H firearms of the same calibre and action on the pistol licence and you are wanting to acquire more firearms of the same calibre and action, please provide a detailed genuine reason why the need cannot be satisfied with the current firearms registered to your pistol licence.

     

    Category H - primary production and sports or target shooting:

    If your current concealable licence (category H) has been issued for both primary production use (PPH or PP1) and sports and target shooting (PC1) in addition to the specific requirements for the individual reason, you must specify which firearm (if any) you require for the purposes of primary production.

     

    Category M - crossbow club:

    • The make, model and serial number of the weapon (if known)
    • Why the weapon is required.

     

    Category A, B or M - recreational shooter

    • The make, model, type, calibre and action of the intended firearm/weapon; serial number (if known)
    • Category B and M, please provide the reason the weapon is required and why the need cannot be satisfied in another way.

     

    Category A, B - primary producer

    • The make, model, type, calibre and action of the intended firearm/weapon;
    • For category B only, provide the reason the weapon is required and why the need cannot be satisfied in another way.

     

    Category C, D or H - primary production

    • All details of the intended firearm/weapon, including serial number, make, model, type, calibre, action and magazine capacity.
    • The reason the weapon is required and why the need cannot be satisfied in another way.

     

    Category C, E or H - Security Organisations

    If there are a number of firearms currently registered to your licence:

    • Provide details as to why an additional firearm/weapon is required; and
    • Why the need cannot be satisfied by the firearm(s)/weapon(s) currently registered to your licence; and
    • The calibre and action of the firearm/weapon.

     

    Category A, B, C, D, H, M, R - Collectors

    Whether the firearm or weapon is permanently or temporarily inoperable.

    • A permanently inoperable D, H, M or R firearm or weapon will require a Form 31 Certificate of Firearm/Weapon being permanently inoperable upon application.
    • A temporarily inoperable firearm/weapon requires information relating to the obvious and significant commemorative, historic, thematic or investment value of the firearms/weapons. (Documentation for each weapon must be substantiated for each claim).

    Category H, temporarily inoperable handguns, other than pre-1901, must also be accompanied by a declaration signed by a representative of an approved historical society (QP517) stating that the representative is satisfied that the firearm/weapon is of obvious and significant commemorative, historic, thematic or investment value.

     

    Next Article

     

  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 3)

     

    What is a "Genuine Reason" to Own a Weapon / Firearm?

    To be issued a Queensland Weapons Act licence, you are required to have a genuine reason for the licence.  You may even have more than 1 genuine reason, which is ok.  Provided you satisfy the requirements, we can endorse a licence for multiple genuine reasons

    Once you've decided what weapon categories you'd like, what type of licence is right for you, and your genuine reason, proceed to the Apply section of the site to determine what you are required to provide. 

    Below are the primary genuine reasons to obtain a licence in Queensland. 

     

    Recreational 

    Recreation shooting is one of the most common reasons for applying for a licence in Queensland.  A recreational licence will enable you to use your firearms on rural lands provided you have a the consent of the owner, or are a member of a hunting body. This can include using firearms on your own property where you don't meet the requirements for primary production, e.g. euthanising stock, or culling feral animals. 

    Permitted licence types:
    • Firearms licence
    • Miscellaneous weapons licence.

     

    Sport or target shooting

    Following recreational shooting, participating in target shooting with your own firearms is another genuine reason to hold a firearms licence. 

    Permitted licence types:
    • Concealable firearms licence
    • Firearms licence
    • Firearms licence (group)
    • Minor's licence
    • Miscellaneous weapons licence

     

    Primary Production 

    You are considered a primary producer if you are primarily engaged in an the occupation of-

    • dairy farmer 
    • wheat, maize, or cereal grower
    • cane grower
    • fruit grower
    • grazier
    • farmer, whether engaged in general or mixed farming, cotton, potato, or vegetable growing, or poultry or pig raising, or
    • in some instances, if you hold a commercial fishers licence issued under the Fisheries Act 1994.

    If you are not primarily engaged in one of these occupations,  if you have a 'hobby' farm, or if you aren't raising stock or growing crops commercially, it is unlikely that your genuine reason is for primary production.  

    A recreational genuine reason may be better suited to your needs.

    Permitted licence types:
    • Firearms licence 
    • Concealable firearms licence
    • Minor's licence

     

    Occupational requirement (including for rural purposes)

    If you have an occupation that requires you to possess or use firearms, this is the genuine reason for you.  Almost all licences are able to be used for a specific occupational purpose. Depending on your occupation, you will be required to provide specific information at the time of applying for a licence. 

    Permitted licence types:
    • Concealable firearms licence
    • Minor's licence
    • Security licence (guard) - employee
    • Security licence (guard) - sole provider
    • Security licence (guard) - business
    • Firearms licence
    • Firearms licence (instructor)
    • Armourer's licence
    • Dealer's licence
    • Firearms licence (group)
    • Security licence (organisation)
    • Collector's licence (weapons)

     

    Collection, preservation or study of weapons

    This genuine reason allows people to collect temporarily or permanently inoperable firearms for the purpose of collection or display in certain circumstances.  Depending on the categories of weapons you wish to collect, you will be required to provide specific information at the time of application. 

    Permitted licence types:
    • Collector's licence (weapons)

     

    Military or medieval re-enactment or historical demonstration

    If you have a keen interest in re-enactment, and are a member of an approved re-enactment society, this may satisfy your genuine reason to hold a licence.  

    Permitted licence types:
    • Miscellaneous weapons licence
    • Firearms licence
    • Collector's licence (weapons)

     

    Sporting organisation firearm to start sporting events

    If you are required to operate a starting pistol for sporting events, this will be your genuine reason. 

    Permitted licence types:

    • Blank-fire firearms licence.

     

    Theatrical organisation firearm for a theatrical production

    If you need to use weapons or supply weapons to movies, television shows or even theatre productions, this would qualify for your genuine reason. 

    Permitted licence types:

    • Blank-fire firearms licence
    • Theatrical ordnance supplier's licence.

     

    Paint-pellet sports

    Lastly, if you're an employee or a participant in paintball sports with your own weapon, this would be your genuine reason. 

    Permitted licence types:
    • Firearms licence

     

    Next Article

     

  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 4)

     

    How to get a Permit to Aquire (PTA) a Firearm in Queensland?

    You cannot own or buy a weapon just because you have a Weapons Licence. You also need a "Permit to Acquire" a Firearm.

    A permit to acquire is for 1 weapon only. You must apply again each time you want to buy or acquire a new weapon..

     

    Video Permit to Acquire (PTA)

    To apply for a permit to acquire, you must have (or have applied for) a valid weapons licence. You can only apply for the type of weapon that is covered on your licence.

    See our video for help applying.

    The permit to acquire will be mailed to you if your application is successful. You can have it faxed to your licensed gun dealer if you include their fax number in your application.

    You will be told (in writing) if your application is not successful.

     

    Apply for a Permit to Acquire

    Online

    There are 2 types of permit —individual and business. Choose what suits you.

     

    Permit to acquire individual

    Permit to acquire business

     

    Apply for a PTA at your Local Police Station

    Download the application form if you cannot apply online.

    Go to your local police station with the completed forms and the other documents you need.

    These include a photo I.D. and details of your current weapons licence or application.

     

    Purchasing or Acquiring a Firearm in Queensland

    Once you have your permit to acquire you must use a licensed dealer to get a weapon.

    You can go directly to a dealer or have them act as an agent between you and another licensed weapon owner.

    Go to your local police station if the nearest dealer is more than 100km from where you live.

     

    Applying for a permit to acquire (PTA) is the first step in acquiring a weapon. If you are acquiring the weapon from a licensed individual (who is not a weapons dealer), you must ensure the sale is brokered.

    A PTA authorises a weapons licence holder to buy or acquire a weapon. This assists QPS in tracking weapons movement and identifying the weapons registered to a licensee and where they are stored.

     

    1. Application

    A Permit to Acquire application must be made for each weapon you intend to acquire. Fees are payable for each application.

    You can now submit and pay for a PTA application online.

    Alternatively, an application for a permit to acquire (form 28) can be downloaded and then lodged and paid for at your local Queensland police station.  At the station you will need to provide details of your current weapons licence and show photographic identification.

     

    2. Waiting period

    The mandatory waiting period for a PTA is 28 days from the date the application is lodged.

    Applicants who do not provide sufficient information or supporting documentation will experience delays in processing or possible rejection of the application.

     

    3. How will you be advised

    If the application is successful, a PTA (Form 27) will be issued by Weapons Licensing and forwarded to you by mail. You can request to have your PTA faxed to a licensed weapons dealer. You will need to provide the dealer's name and fax number in writing to Weapons Licensing.

    If the application is not successful, you will be notified in writing.

     

    4. Permit to acquire/notice of disposal – form 27

    Form 27 is an approved and issued PTA, which is in two parts.  The top half of this form is your issued PTA and the bottom half is the notice of disposal. The expiry date will be nominated on the PTA. If you do not acquire the weapon before the PTA expires you will need to apply for a new PTA.

    Once you have received your PTA (form 27) you may purchase or acquire the weapon.

     

    5. Acquiring from a licensed weapons dealer

    If you are acquiring the weapon from a licensed weapons Dealer they will sign the front of the notice of disposal. The dealer will then forward the completed form to Weapons Licensing. On receipt, Weapons Licensing will transfer the registration of the nominated weapon to your licence.

     

    6. Acquiring from a licensed individual

    If you are acquiring a weapon from a licensed individual, you are required to have the transaction brokered by a licensed weapons dealer. The transaction can be brokered by a Queensland police officer if the nearest licensed dealer is more than 100km from your usual place of residence.

    The weapons dealer or police officer will check the bottom section of the PTA and complete the licensed dealer/police certificate on the reverse side of the PTA. The dealer or police officer will then forward the completed form to Weapons Licensing. On receipt, Weapons Licensing will transfer the registration of the weapon to your licence.

    The disposer of the weapon is required to sign the notice of disposal. If for some reason the disposer is unable to sign the document, a statutory declaration outlining the reason must be attached to the form 27.

    Both the acquirer and disposer should sign the back of the PTA.

    If you fail to present the weapon with the PTA to a licensed weapons dealer (or a police officer) the transaction is not complete.  The firearm will not be registered to your licence. The PTA will expire and you will be unlawfully in possession of a firearm and at risk of prosecution.

     

    7. Registration of the firearm to your licence

    Once Weapons Licensing receives the completed notice of disposal, the weapon will be transferred from the disposer’s licence and registered to your licence.  It will then be reflected on your weapons list which Weapons Licensing will forward to you once the transaction has been finalised on the Commissioner’s firearms register.

     

    8. Modifying a PTA

    If you require modification to a PTA (i.e. you have changed your mind about the weapon to be acquired) you must return the original PTA to Weapons Licensing for modification.

     

    9. PTA expires before acquiring a weapon

    A PTA cannot be used to acquire a weapon once it has expired. Therefore, if a PTA expires before you have acquired a weapon the PTA will be unusable and should be returned to Weapons Licensing.  A PTA cannot be renewed and you will need to make a new application.

     

    10. Lost/stolen/destroyed PTAs

    If a PTA is lost, stolen or destroyed you must immediately report the matter to a police station and complete Form 3 - application for replacement licence - permit to acquire. On receipt of the Form 3, Weapons Licensing will issue a replacement.​

     

    Next Article

     

     
  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 5)

     

    The Types of Weapons Licences Available in Queensland

     

    In order to own and use a firearms in Queensland, you first need to apply for a Weapons Licence. The Weapons Act covers the licensing of firearms, certain knives, crossbows and paintball guns. There are several Weapons Licences that you can apply for in Queensland. The type of Weapons Licence you need to acquire will depend upon the categories and specifications of the firearms you with to purchase and own.

     

    Types of Weapons Licences

     

    The type of licence you need depends on the category of weapon you want to own or use, and what you want to use it for.

    • Firearms Licence: The most commonly used general licence used by farmers and sports and target shooters.
    • Minor: A restricted firearms licence for young people between the ages of 11 and17 which allows use of weapons in certain circumstances, but not the acquisition of firearms.
    • Visitor: For people temporarily visiting Queensland with a firearm.
    • Armourer: Required if you run a business for the storage, manufacture, modification or repair of weapons.
    • Dealer: Required if you run a business buying or selling weapons.
    • Firearms instructor: Required if you give firearms’ training on behalf of a Registered Training Organisation.
    • Group: Authorises members of an organisation or employees of an organisation to possess and use weapons for the purpose stated on your licence e.g. members of a sports or target shooting club.
    • Blank-fire firearm: Issued for the use of blank-fire firearms for use in the theatre or at sporting events.
    • Theatrical ordnance supplier: Required if you run a business supplying weapons on a temporary basis for use in theatre film or television productions.
    • Collector's licence: Required by weapons collectors and permits the ownership of temporarily or permanently disabled weapons.
    • Miscellaneous weapons: Required for the use of body armour, crossbows and the possession of some knives.
    • Concealable firearms: Specifically for handguns.
    • Security (guard): Required if you provide armed security services for the escort of valuables.
    • Security (organisation): Required by businesses providing armed security services for the escort of valuables by licensed employees.

     

    Firearms Licence

     

    This is the most common type of weapons licence held in Queensland. It allows you to possess and use single shot or manual repeating rifles and shotguns (categories A & B). Genuine reasons for a firearms licence include sports and target shooting or occupational reasons (for example, if you work in primary production). It’s possible to possess a semi-automatic rifle or shotgun (categories C & D) under a firearms licence, but you will need to provide strong evidence for your genuine reason to possess these more powerful weapons.

     

    Concealable Firearms Licence

    A concealable firearms licence authorises the possession and use of category H weapons. Category H includes any firearm under 75cm in length, except a powerhead. Even if such a firearm has been rendered permanently inoperable, it is still classified as category H. This can include an air pistol, a centre-fire pistol, black powder pistol or a rim-fire pistol. A concealable firearms licence can only be issued for one of the following genuine reasons:

    • Sports or target shooting
    • Primary production
    • Other occupational reasons.

    See How to Apply for a Concealable Firearms Licence for Target Shooting

     

    Minor's Licence

     
    A minor’s licence allows you to possess and use category A, B & H weapons for sports or target shooting; or primary production on rural land. In some cases, your minor’s licence may allow you to use a category C weapon for clay target shooting or occupational purposes. A minor’s licence can only be issued to someone between the ages of 11 and 17 years (inclusive). Once you turn 18, you will have to apply for an appropriate adult licence, as your minor’s licence will no longer be valid.

     

    Collector's Licence


    ​​To be considered collectable, a firearm must be of obvious and significant commemorative, historic, thematic or investment value. There are two types of licence in this category – a collector’s licence (weapons) and a collector’s licence (heirloom). A collector’s licence (weapons) is for a person or group that collects weapons, such as a museum, historical society or RSL.

    Any weapons held must be made temporarily or permanently inoperable (depending on the category of weapon) and cannot be operated or discharged under this licence. A collector’s licence (heirloom) is for a person who has been handed down a single weapon as part of a will or bequest. The weapon must be made permanently inoperable. Only one weapon can be registered to this licence.

     

    Blank-fire Firearms Licence


    Blank-fire firearms licences allow the use of blank-fire firearms for two purposes only – to start sporting events, or for use in theatrical productions. A blank-fire firearms licence can be issued to a theatrical organisation, or an athletic or other sporting organisation.

     

    Visitor's Licence


    A visitor’s licence allows you to use a weapon while you are in Queensland as a visitor. If you are visiting from another Australian state or territory, you do not need a visitor’s licence, as long as you are using the weapons as part of:

    A shooting competition, including training for a shooting competition,
    Recreational shooting (hunting) on rural land with the written consent of the owner, or
    A requirement to shoot on rural land for an occupational purpose.
    For all other reasons, interstate visitors to Queensland must apply for a visitor’s licence.

    If you are an international visitor and you wish to use a weapon while in Queensland or elsewhere in Australia, you will need a visitor’s licence and a special permit from Australian Police. You must be entitled by law to possess and use a weapon in the state or country where you normally reside.

     

    Miscellaneous Weapon's Licence


    A miscellaneous weapons licence covers weapons in the E and M categories. Category E includes bulletproof vests and body armour. Category M includes crossbows and some martial arts weapons, as well as some historical or military weapons. If you want to possess a crossbow for sports, target or recreational shooting or historical and military re-enactments, you need a miscellaneous weapons licence.

     

    Firearms Licence (Instructor) Licence


    The firearms licence (instructor) licence allows you to possess and use firearms to deliver approved firearms training. To apply for this licence, you must be authorised by a registered training organisation and have completed the relevant course/s. You can then possess and use firearms within the categories endorsed on your licence for use in training. Legislation also allows students taking an approved course to possess or use a firearm supplied by the licensed instructor, under supervision from the instructor as part of the training course.

     

    Armourer's Licence


    ​​An armourer’s licence is for a person or organisation that operates a business storing, manufacturing, modifying or repairing weapons. The armourer’s licence may be endorsed for weapon categories A, B, C, D, E, H, M and R.

     

    Group Licence


    ​​A group licence allows the members, officers and employees of the group to physically possess and use weapons for the purpose stated on the licence. However, the members, officers or employees must hold a current licence that allows them to possess and use weapons of the same type allowed under the group licence. A group licence can be issued for two genuine reasons – either because an individual or organisation has an occupational need to possess weapons, or for a sports or target shooting club.

     

    Security Licence (Guard)


    A security guard is a person who patrols, protects, watches over or guards (protects) their own or someone else’s property, as part of their own business or as an employee of a security business. There are four types of security licence:

    Security licence (guard) - employee: a security guard employed by a security organisation.
    Security licence (guard) - sole provider: a security guard who works as a sole provider.
    Security licence (guard) - business: relates to a person protecting their own property and not providing security services to others.
    Security licence - organisation: relates people or organisations providing security services by licensed employees.

     

    Theatrical Ordnance Supplier's Licence


    A theatrical ordnance supplier's licence is for a person or organisation that supplies weapons on a temporary basis for use in theatrical, film or television productions. The supply of the weapons must not involve a change of ownership of the weapons. This licence allows the possession and supply of blank-fire, replica or permanently inoperable firearms.

     

    Dealer's Licence


    A dealer is a person (other than an armourer or theatrical ordnance supplier) who operates a business that:

    Acquires, sells or disposes of weapons
    Displays weapons for sale
    Possesses weapons for sale.
    A dealer’s licence allows you to operate a business buying, selling and broking the weapons endorsed on the licence, except for category R and restricted category M weapons. It allows you to act as a broker for a theatrical ordnance supplier to acquire permanently inoperable or blank-fire weapons in category R. It also allows you to receive, dispatch, repair or store weapons.

     

    Next Article

     

  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 6)

     

    Additional Forms for a Weapons Licence Application in Queensland

     

    Online Applications

    You can apply online for a weapons licence or permit to acquire a weapon. As part of your online application, you can upload all the supporting documents you need to submit, and pay the fee using a credit or debit card.

     

    Finding the forms you need

    Our forms contains all the forms you need to support your application. These can be completed on a computer, then printed and signed. Alternatively, you can print the forms and complete them by hand. We’ve sorted the forms into sections to make it easier to find what you’re looking for.

    This library contains copies of forms which can be downloaded and printed.

     

    Forms:

    Download the Purchase Order Form - To Purchase Special Forms 

     

    New Weapons Application Form

    Form 1 - application for a weapons licence

     

    Form 1 Annexures

    Download Form: Collector's application

    Download Form:  Historical or military re-enactments category M crossbows

    Download Form:  Sports or target shooting

    Download Form:  Recreational shooting and recreational fishing

    Download Form:  Primary production

    Download Form:  Rural employee

    Download Form:  Occupational - armourer/dealer

    Download Form:  Occupational - security

    Download Form:  Occupational - other

    Download Form:  Other reasons

     

    Visitor's Licence

    Download Form:   Visitor's licence application

     

    Licence Renewal

    Application to renew a weapons licence

    Guide to renewing

    Early lodgement of renewal application (to accompany renewal application)

    Genuine reason annexure

     

     Cancel your Weapons Licence 

     Notice of surrender of licence

     

     Expired Licence Brochure

    Expired licence brochure

     

     Replace Licence or Permit to Acquire

    Application for replacement licence / permit to acquire

     

     Managing Your Weapons Licence Details - Name & Address

    Change of address / change of name / change of weapon(s) secure storage facility

    Change of weapons category and / or change of condition(s) of licence

    Change of business particulars / change of representatives

    Change of business particulars / other reasons

    Application for transfer of weapons

    Form 34 - licensed dealer associate details

    QP 0415 firearms list

     

    Acquiring or Disposing of Firearms & Weapons

    Form 28 - application for a permit to acquire

    B709 - import permit

    Form 8 - receipt for surrendered weapon(s)

    Weapons licensing indemnity receipt

     

    Forms for Firearms Club, Rifle Ranges & Shooting Galleries

     

    Form 12 - Dealer annual return

    Form 15A - Application/Renewal for a Shooting Club Permit

    Form 15B - Application/Renewal for a Shooting Range Approval

    Form 15C - Application/Renewal for Approval to Conduct a Shooting Gallery

    Form 15CA - Application for Additional Representative - Shooting Gallery

    Form 15D - Application for Approval to Conduct an Arms Fair

    Form 15E - Application for Approval for a Historical Society

    Form 15F - Application for an Exemption

    Form 15G - Application for Approval for a Weapons Club

    Form 15G - Annexure - Sports Target Shooting - Category M Crossbows

    Form 15G - Annexure Recreational Shooting

    Form 15G - Annexure - Historical or Military Re-enactment Demonstration use - Category M Crossbows

    Form 15G - Annexure - Historical or Military Re-enactment - Training only Category M Crossbows

    Form 20A - Club Range use Register (Category H only)

    Form 20B -  Club Range use Register (other than Category H)

    Form 20C - Club Range use Register (Category A B H)

    Form 33 - Declaration by an Unauthorised Person for use of a Weapon at an Approved Range 

    Form 33A - Declaration by an Unlicensed Person to Possess a Weapon at an Approved Range

    QP 0515 - Application for Statement of Eligibility to Join an Approved Pistol Shooting Club

    QP 0516 - Pistol Club Shooters Participation Guide

    QP 0517 - Approved Historical Society Declaration (Collector's Licence)

    QP 0518A - Approved Club Declaration - Concealable Firearms (Queensland Applicant)

    QP 0518B - Approved Club Declaration - Concealable Firearms (Interstate / Overseas)

    Pistol Club Participation Template

    Participation Shoots Calculator

     

    Next Article

     

     
  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 7)

     

    Categories of Weapons in Queensland

    Depending on your licence type and your need for a weapon, your licence may be endorsed with categories that are appropriate for that licence and your need.

    These categories are:

    Category (A) 

    Rimfire rifles, single or double barrel shotguns, paintball guns, air rifles and powerheads (a specialised weapon for use underwater).

     

    (1 ) Each of the following is a category A weapon if it has not been rendered permanently inoperable—

    (a) a miniature cannon under 120cm in barrel length that is a black powder and muzzle loading cannon, depicting a scale model of an historical artillery piece or naval gun;

    (b) an air rifle;

    (c) a rim-fire rifle (other than a self-loading rim-fire rifle);

    (d) a shotgun other than a lever action shotgun, pump action shotgun or self-loading shotgun;

    (e) a powerhead;

    (f) a break action shotgun and rim-fire rifle combination;

    (g) an air gun;

    (h) a weapon mentioned in any of paragraphs (a) to (g) that is a blank-fire firearm.

    (2) A conversion unit is also a category A weapon.

    (3) In this section—

    air gun means a firearm designed to discharge a projectile (including, for example, an arrow) by compressed air, or other compressed gas, not generated by an explosive.

    conversion unit means a unit or device or barrel that is capable of being used for converting a category A weapon that is a firearm from one calibre to another calibre.

     

    Category (B) 

     

    Centre-fire rifles (other than semi-automatic); shotgun/rifle combinations.

     

    (1) Each of the following is a category B weapon if it has not been rendered permanently inoperable—

    (a) a muzzle-loading firearm;

    (b) a single shot centre-fire rifle;

    (c) a double barrel centre-fire rifle;

    (d) a repeating centre-fire rifle;

    (e) a break action shotgun and centre-fire rifle combination;

    (f) a lever action shotgun with a magazine capacity of not greater than 5 rounds;

    (g) a weapon mentioned in any of paragraphs (a) to (f) that is a blank-fire firearm.

    (2) A conversion unit is also a category B weapon.

    (3) In this section—

    conversion unit means a unit or device or barrel that is capable of being used for converting a category B weapon that is a firearm from one calibre to another calibre.

     

    Category (C) 

    Semi-automatic or pump action shotguns (capable of holding 5 rounds or less); and semi-automatic rimfire rifles (capable of holding less than 10 rounds).

     

    Each of the following is a category C weapon if it has not been rendered permanently inoperable—

    (a) a semiautomatic rim-fire rifle with a magazine capacity no greater than 10 rounds;

    (b) a semiautomatic shotgun with a magazine capacity no greater than 5 rounds;

    (c) a pump action shotgun with a magazine capacity no greater than 5 rounds;

    (d) a weapon mentioned in any of paragraphs (a) to (c) that is a blank-fire firearm.

     

    Category (D) 

    Semi-automatic centre-fire rifles; semi-automatic shotguns (capable of holding more than 5 rounds); and semi-automatic rimfire rifles (capable of holding more than 10 rounds).

     

    (1) Each of the following is a category D weapon—

    (a) a self-loading centre-fire rifle designed or adapted for military purposes or a firearm that substantially duplicates a rifle of that type in design, function or appearance;

    (b) a non-military style self-loading centre-fire rifle;

    (c) a self-loading shotgun with a magazine capacity of greater than 5 rounds;

    (d) a pump action shotgun with a magazine capacity of greater than 5 rounds;

    (e) a self-loading rim-fire rifle with a magazine capacity of more than 10 rounds;

    (f) a lever action shotgun with a magazine capacity of greater than 5 rounds;

    (g) a weapon mentioned in any of paragraphs (a) to (f) that is a blank-fire firearm.

    (2) Subsection (1) applies to a weapon mentioned in the subsection even if the weapon is permanently inoperable.

     

    Category (E) 

    Bullet-proof vests.

     

    (1) A bulletproof vest or protective body vest or body armour designed to prevent the penetration of small arms projectiles is a category E weapon.

    (2) In this section—

    body armour

    (a) means an article designed for anti-ballistic purposes that is designed to be worn on a part of the body; and

    (b) does not include a helmet, or other article, designed for sight or hearing protection.

     

    Category (H) 

    Handguns.

     

    (1) A firearm, including an air pistol and a blank-fire firearm, under 75cm in length, other than a powerhead, is a category H weapon, regardless of whether it has been rendered permanently inoperable.

    (2) A conversion unit is also a category H weapon.

    (3) This section does not apply to a powerhead or category C, D or R weapon.

    (4) In this section—

    conversion unit means a unit or device or barrel that is capable of being used for converting a category H weapon that is a firearm from one calibre to another calibre.

    For schedule 2 of the Act, each of the following comprises a class of category H weapon—

    (a) an air pistol;
    (b) a centre-fire pistol with a calibre of not more than .38 inch or a black-powder pistol;
    (c) a centre-fire pistol with a calibre of more than .38 inch but not more than .45 inch;
    (d) a rim-fire pistol.

     

    Category (M) 

     

    Crossbows, certain knives and other hand held weapons capable of causing bodily harm.

     

    Each of the following is a category M weapon—

    (a) any clothing, apparel, adornment, accessory or other thing—

    (i) designed to disguise any weapon or other cutting or piercing instrument capable of causing bodily harm (Examples  a bowen knife belt, a credit card knife

    or

    (ii) designed for use as a weapon or a cutting or piercing instrument capable of causing bodily harm;

    (b) any knife so designed or constructed so as to be used as a weapon that while the knife is held in 1 hand, the blade may be released by that hand;

    (c) a ballistic knife that propels or releases a knife-like blade of any material by any means other than an explosive;

    (d) a butterfly knife, a knife known as a ‘balisong’, a pantographic knife, or a similar device that consists of a single-edged or multi-edged blade or spike that fits within 2 handles attached to the blade or spike by transverse pivot pins or pantographic linkage and is capable of being opened by gravity or centrifugal force;

    (e) a flick knife, or a similar device of any material that has a blade folded or recessed into the handle that opens automatically by gravity or centrifugal force or if pressure is applied to a button, spring or device in or attached to the handle of the device;

    (f) a push knife, or a similar device designed as a weapon that consists of a single-edged or multi-edged blade or spike and allows the blade or spike to be supported by the palm of the hand so that stabbing blows or slashes can be inflicted by a punching or pushing action;

    (g) a sheath knife, or a similar device of any material that has a sheath which withdraws into its handle by gravity or centrifugal force or if pressure is applied to a button, spring or device attached to or forming part of the sheath, handle or blade of the device;

    (h) a star knife, or a similar device that consists of at least 2 angular points, blades or spikes, of any material, disposed outwardly about a central axis point and that are designed to spin around the central axis point in flight when thrown at a target;

    (i) a trench knife, or a similar device that consists of a single-edged or multi-edged blade or spike of any material that is fitted with a handle made of any hard substance that is designed to be fitted over the knuckles of the hand of the user to protect the knuckles and increase the effect of a punch or blow;

    (j) a riding crop that contains, conceals or disguises a knife, stiletto or any other single-edged or multi-edged blade or spike of any length or of any material;

    (k) a walking stick or cane that contains, conceals or disguises a sword or any other single-edged or multi-edged blade, knife or spike of any length or of any material;

    (l) any incendiary or inflammable device containing any substance capable of causing bodily harm or damage to property that is primarily designed for vegetation management;

    (m) any pistol crossbow designed to be discharged by the use of 1 hand (that is not a toy pistol crossbow) that when discharged is capable of causing damage or injury to property or capable of causing bodily harm;

    (n) any crossbow designed to be discharged by the use of 2 hands that, when discharged, is capable of causing damage or injury to property or capable of causing bodily harm;

    (o) a chinese throwing iron that is a hard non-flexible plate having 3 or more radiating points with 1 or more sharp edges in the shape of a polygon, trefoil, cross, star, diamond or geometric shape and constructed or designed to be thrown as a weapon;

    (p) a flail or similar device constructed and designed as a weapon consisting of in part a striking head and which, if used offensively against a person, is capable of causing bodily harm;

    (q) a device known as a ‘manrikiguisari’ or ‘kusari’, consisting of a length of rope, cord, wire or chain fastened at each end to a geometrically shaped weight or handgrip and constructed or designed for use as a weapon;

    (r) a device known as a knuckleduster or any device made or adapted for use as a knuckleduster and which, if used offensively against a person, is capable of causing bodily harm;

    (s) a weighted glove designed or constructed to be used as a weapon;

    (t) a mace or any similar article (other than a ceremonial mace made for and used solely as a symbol of authority on ceremonial occasions);

    (u) any device, not a toy, constructed or designed as a telescopic baton, the extension of which is actuated by the operation of a mechanical trigger.

     

    Category (R) 

     

    Machine guns, fully automatic large calibre military weapons.

     

    Each of the following is a category R weapon--

    (a) a machine gun or submachine gun that is fully automatic in its operation and actuated by energy developed when it is being fired or has multiple revolving barrels, and any replica or facsimile of a machine gun or submachine gun that is not a toy;

    (b) a unit or device that is capable of being used for converting any firearm to a weapon mentioned in paragraph (a);

    (c) a firearm capable of firing 50 calibre BMG cartridge ammunition;

    (d) an antipersonnel gas, and an antipersonnel substance, of a corrosive, noxious or irritant nature or that is capable of causing bodily harm, and any weapon capable of discharging the gas or substance by any means, other than a gas or substance and any weapon capable of discharging the gas or substance that is primarily designed for the control of native or feral animals;

    (e) an acoustical antipersonnel device of an intensity that is capable of causing bodily harm;

    (f) an electrical antipersonnel device of an intensity that is capable of causing bodily harm;

    (g) a hand grenade, other than an inert hand grenade, and an antipersonnel mine;

    (h) a silencer or other device or contrivance made or used, or capable of being used, or intended to be used, for reducing the sound caused by discharging a firearm;

    (i) a rocket launcher, recoilless rifle, antitank rifle, a bazooka or a rocket propelled grenade type launcher;

    (j) a mortar, all artillery and any incendiary or inflammable device containing any substance capable of causing bodily harm or damage to property, other than an incendiary or inflammable device primarily designed for vegetation management.

    There is also a category of ‘restricted items’ which includes handcuffs, thumb cuffs or other similar restraints, martial arts weapons, studded gloves and some clubs and laser pointers..

     

     Restricted Items

    The following items are restricted items for section 67 of the Act—

     (a) handcuffs, thumbcuffs or other similar restraints;

    (b) nunchaku or kung-fu sticks or any similar device which consists of 2 hard non-flexible sticks, clubs, pipes or rods connected by a length of rope, cord, wire or chain constructed or designed to be used in connection with the practice of a system of self-defence and which if used offensively against a person is or are capable of causing bodily harm;

    (c) a billy club, a baton or any device constructed or designed as a telescopic baton, not being a toy or a category M weapon, that if used is capable of causing bodily harm;

    (d) any studded glove which if used offensively against a person is capable of causing bodily harm;

    (e) a laser pointer.

     
     

    Next Article

     

     
  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 8)

     

    Apply for Concealable Licence for Target Shooting in Queensland

    Before you can apply for a Category H concealable firearms licence for the Sport or Target Shooting, there are a few things you need to do.

     

    Step 1 - Join a pistol club as an eligible member
    You are required to become an eligible member of a shooting club.

    In order to become an eligible member, you must:

    already possess a weapons act licence, or
    have obtained a statement of eligibility issued by Weapons Licensing.
    If you don't possess a statement of eligibility or a Weapons Act Licence, you are not considered an eligible person to join a pistol club.

     

    Step 2 - Maintain membership and complete the required shoots
    Once you become an eligible member, you must maintain this membership for at least 6 months before applying for a licence.

    During that 6 months, you are required to complete at least 3 participation shoots.


    Step 3 - Approved club declaration (QP518A) and application
    Your club representative is required to complete an approved club declaration (QP518A). This declaration proves your membership to the club and makes up part of your application.

    This declaration is valid for only 28 days, so make sure once you receive this declaration, you apply for your licence.

    You must also include a participation record card showing you have completed the 3 required shoots. The shoots must have taken place within the six months immediately before the 'approved club declaration (Queensland applicant)' being signed, and on separate days.

     

    Application for a Queensland Concealable Firearms Licence (Cat H)

     

    Concealable Firearms Licence (Cat H) for Sport of Target Shooting


    To support your application, you will need to provide:

     

    Proof of address (Queensland Drivers Licence, rates notice or electricity bill).

    Your statement of attainment for an approved firearms safety course, covering the category of weapon you’re applying for.

    Approved Club Declaration, Queensland Applicant (Form QP518A), completed by the club representative within the previous 28 days. The QP518A is the proof of current financial membership of an approved Queensland Pistol Club. If you have moved from interstate the club representative must complete a QP518B instead.

    A copy of your participation record card showing you have completed the three required shoots. These must have taken place within the six months prior to the Approved Club Declaration (Queensland Applicant) being signed.

    Details of any medical condition endorsed on your Queensland Drivers Licence.

    A current passport-quality photograph.

    Additional information: If you wish to use handguns for accredited events, please provide details specific details of the handguns you will be using, as well as details of the accredited events. You will also need to supply a letter from an approved shooting club verifying your participation. Once you are ready to commence your application please agree to the following statement by reading the important information below and selecting the check box.

     

    Restrictions on the Type of Handguns in Queensland

     

    A holder of a concealable firearms licence, who is a member of an approved shooting club, must not use a weapon that:

    • has a calibre greater than .38 inch (except for black-powder pistols) unless they have applied for and been approved to use high calibre weapons,
    • is semi automatic and has a barrel length of less than 120mm unless it has an overall length of at least 250mm measured parallel to the barrel,
    • is not semi automatic (e.g. revolvers and single shot pistols) and has a barrel length of less than 100 mm unless it has an overall length of at least 250 mm measured parallel to the barrel,
    • has a capacity of more than 10 rounds, and
    • is designed to be used without a magazine that has a maximum capacity of more than 10 rounds.

    Calibre limitations do not apply to category H weapons that are black-powder pistols.

    A black-powder pistol is a firearm that is less than 75 cm in length; and is either:

    • a muzzle loading firearm; or
    • a cap and ball firearm; and
    • does not accept cartridge ammunition.

     

    Next Article

     

     

  • 10 Part Guide to a Firearms Licence in Queensland (Part 9)

     

    Concealable Licence (Cat H) Occupational & Primary Production

     

    Queensland is one of the only sane States in Australia that continues to issue concealable licences to primary producers. Authorised Officers are still issuing licences for category H firearms to primary producers who have shown that they meet the proof requirements. Other states like Western Australia took away handguns from pastorialists some years ago. The legislation still suggests that their is a route to handgun licensing for Primary Producers but the fact that no licences have been issued (to my knowledge) for handguns in this category speaks for itself. Only Queensland stands out as a basteon of common sense in this regard.

     

    During the assessment of a New Application or Renewal for a Concealable Firearms Licence (Category H), an Authorised Officer within Weapons Licensing uses the following tools to make a decision on an application:

     

    • The Weapons Act 1990, Weapons Regulation 2016 and Weapons Categories Regulation 1997.
    • The results of decisions handed down by the QLD Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT) when a person has appealed the decision by an Authorised Officer to reject a weapons licence application.
    • The clauses detailed in the National Firearms Agreement (NFA) in relation to Primary Producers and the possession of a category H firearm.
    • Queensland Globe technology provided by the Queensland Government. This is an online interactive tool which displays physical, geographic and spatial data about a location in map format. The spatial data displays layers on QLD roads, property, topography, land valuations, land parcel information and more. https://qldglobe.information.qld.gov.au/
    • Colour photographs of the terrain and surrounding features to demonstrate any special circumstances that make the use of a rifle or long-arm weapon impracticable or impossible.
    • Animal welfare guidelines such as the Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for Cattle, the CSIRO Model Code of Practice for the Welfare of Animals and Pestsmart Standard Operational Procedures for controlling feral animals. These codes of practice do not advocate handguns for the humane destruction of feral animals and euthanasia of livestock. Examples will be outlined later in this document.

     

    General Information:

     

    1. Section 15(3) and 18(5) of the Weapons Act 1990 stipulates that in determining an application for the issue or renewal of a licence, an authorised officer may consider anything at the officer’s disposal. In addition to this, the authorised officer must consider the information outlined below, (including the applicable legislation and relevant case law decisions.)
    2. If you have previously held a concealable licence for occupational purposes, this does not necessarily mean you will automatically be approved for another one upon application for renewal. You must include all information and material to substantiate your application. The principle applied from a previous Tribunal decision is:- The fact that a licence has been previously issued does not give rise to any legitimate expectation that the licence will be renewed indefinitely and may be rejected with or without any further information. Sobey v Commercial and Private Agents Board [22 S.A.S.R 1979] 72
    3. The use of category H firearms for recreational shooting is specifically prohibited by section 22(2) of the Weapons Regulation 2016.
    4. Personal protection is not a genuine reason for acquiring, possessing or using a firearm.
    5. Easy carriage is not a genuine reason for a concealable licence.

     

     Considerations:

     

    1. Section 10 of the Weapons Act 1990 provides the limitations on the issue of a licence and outlines the strict requirements that must be met for the issue of a licence.
    2. Sections 15(3) and 18(5) of the Weapons Act 1990 stipulates that in deciding the application, the authorised officer may consider anything at the officer’s disposal.
    3. To apply for the concealable licence, you must have a genuine reason for the possession of a category H firearm: a. Section 11(c) of the Weapons Act 1990 stipulates that one of the genuine reasons for the possession of a weapon includes “an occupational requirement, including an occupational requirement for rural purposes”. b. Therefore, the genuine reason for a farmer could be for an occupational requirement for a rural purpose as a primary producer.
    4. To determine if you are a primary producer, the Authorised Officer considers the definition of primary producer in the Weapons Act 1990 and how the courts have previously interpreted the word ‘primarily’.
    5. The definition of a primary producer under the Weapons Act 1990 is not the same as the definition by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), and any decision made by an Authorised Officer within Weapons Licencing will not impact your status with the ATO.
    6. Concealable licences are not generally issued for the purpose of feral animal control in primary production due to the limited range and accuracy of a concealable firearm.

     

    Definition of a Primary Producer

     

    A primary producer means a person (not being a person engaged in primary production as an employee on wages or piecework rates) primarily engaged in the occupation of—

    (a) dairy farmer; or

    (b) wheat, maize, or cereal grower; or

    (c) cane grower; or

    (d) fruit grower; or

    (e) grazier; or

    (f) farmer, whether engaged in general or mixed farming, cotton, potato, or vegetable growing, or poultry or pig raising; and includes a person prescribed by regulation.

     

    Primarily engaged does not include part time. If you work in town five days a week and on the farm on the weekend, it is likely that an authorised officer would not consider you a primary producer. The authorised officer could consider you for the issue of a concealable licence for an occupational use if you meet all the requirements.

     

    QCAT Decisions

    Previous QCAT decisions and principles an Authorised Officer considers include:

    Occupational Requirement

    If it is a requirement of the applicant’s occupation that they be able to use a pistol, the occupational requirement had to be genuine.

    Cseke v Queensland Police Service [2005] QCAT 466 Principle applied: It had to be a requirement of the applicant’s occupation that he be able to use the pistol. Moreover, the occupational requirement had to be genuine. The decision maker cannot be criticized for being more conscientious than previous decision maker.

     

    Necessary

    As required by Section 13(5) of the Weapons Act 1990, the applicant must show “why possession of a weapon is necessary in the conduct of the applicant’s business or employment”. Further, why it gives rise to a special need to be issued with a licence for category H firearms. The Tribunal has previously considered the term ‘necessary’ as used in section 13(5) of Weapons Act 1990 and determined that convenience or preference does not meet this test.

     

    The applicant must justify: 

      1. Why the possession of a category H firearm is necessary in the conduct of the applicant’s business as a primary producer; and,
      2. Why the use of a category H firearm is required, and why the use of a long-arm such as category A or B firearm could not meet the same need. Please note that convenience, preference or self-protection is not a genuine reason.

    Shaxson v Queensland Police Service, Weapons Licensing Branch [2014] QCAT 309 ‘Necessary,’ according to common usage, connotes something which is required, rather than something which is merely convenient or a matter of preference. In the context, it reasonably connotes that the requirement can not be met in some other way, and can not currently be appropriately met…special need for a handgun would not have been established.

     

    Further clarification of necessary and special need has been provided by QCAT and the Authorised Officer will consider:

      1. The size of your property;
      2. The terrain of your property; and,
      3. Special circumstances that make the use of a rifle or long-arm weapon impracticable or impossible. (i.e. limited access to the majority of the property due to vegetation and steep hills.)

    An Authorised Officer will utilise Queensland Globe and colour photographs to assess whether the size, demographics and vegetation on your property is of such a nature that a category H firearm is required to carry out the humane destruction of stock that may be injured in remote parts of your property.

     

    Previous QCAT decisions provide guidance here:

    The issue of a concealable licence for the use of occupational primary production is generally restricted to very large land holdings which have excessively rugged terrain requiring the extensive use of motorbikes or horseback to access.

     

    These properties generally must be of a size that if any firearm was not carried and livestock is located and needed to be put down, the delay in returning to retrieve a firearm would cause inhumane suffering to the animal.

     

    QCAT has previously considered a property of 16,400 hectares, or 42,000 acres, that only had limited four-wheel drive access with most of it being accessed on horseback and with less than 0.9% of open grazing land. QCAT decided that this established a ‘special need’ which supported the issue of an occupational Concealable Firearms Licence (category H).

     

    Further, QCAT considered that if there was better vehicle access to a greater proportion of the property and not necessarily all of the property, it would have resulted in the ‘special need’ not being established. Harm v Queensland Police Service [2010] QCAT 518, Senior Tribunal Member Oliver.

     

    You should also be aware that if your property consists of a leasehold agreement with the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS), you require a letter of permission from the Regional Director to use firearms on that portion of your property.

     

    QPWS generally only authorise the use of category A and B weapons on leasehold areas.

     

    Further case law considered in making this decision includes:

    Feeney v Queensland Police Service (Weapons Licensing Branch)[2017] QCAT 203 The Authorised Officer must consider whether there is a “special need”that would warrant the issue of an occupational licence and whether or not the need can be met in another way, including the use of another category of firearm.

     

    It is important to note: 

    • The mere use of a horse or motorcycle, or earthmoving machinery in itself does not lead to a requirement for a handgun.
    • The Weapons Act 1990 precludes a person from being licensed for the purposes of self-protection. https://www.sclqld.org.au/caselaw/QCAT/2017/203

     

    Harm v Queensland Police Service [2010] QCAT 518

     Principle applied: Property size, terrain and access are considerations in determining if a ‘special need’ for the issue of a concealable firearms licence is established. https://www.sclqld.org.au/caselaw/QCAT/2010/518

     

    Geary v Queensland Police Service Weapons Licensing [2017] QCAT 6 Principle applied: use of concealable weapons will only be necessary where the terrain or special circumstances make the use of a rifle or long-arm weapon impractical or impossible…The mere use of a horse or motor cycle, or earthmoving machinery, in itself does not lead to a requirement for a handgun. https://www.sclqld.org.au/caselaw/QCAT/2017/6

     

    Bergmann and Commissioner of Police [2009] WASAT 233 Principle applied: the Weapons Act precludes a person from being licensed for the purposes of self-protection.

     

    Baker v Queensland Police Service Weapons Licensing [2019] QCAT Principle applied: the size of the property, the terrain and the extent to which he has demonstrated a need to use a pistol in the past… could equally attend to all of the occupational needs with a rifle. Being able to carry a pistol may be more convenient but there is a reasonable alternative. Carrying a rifle when necessary is not an unreasonable burden in the proper management of the rural enterprise. In addition, that weapon possession and use, here a pistol, is subordinate to the need to ensure public and individual safety.

     

    Some of the things that you could include in your application are: 

    The situation which previously required the use of a concealable firearm on your property. Including where you were on the property, what happened, how often this has happened and why a long-arm would have been ineffective. (Remembering - convenience is not a justification/reason for possessing a concealable firearm). 

    • The frequency and need of humane destruction of livestock with a concealable firearm and if you used a concealable firearm, why? 
    • The quantity and type of livestock you run on your property.
    • The frequency and use of a long-arm to affect the euthanasia of an animal or feral animal, the details, location on the property and the frequency of this occurring
    • Describing the type of land required to traverse and why a concealable weapon is the only option. Include information why a long-arm could not be used.
    • Whether the commercial firearm carrying product options available on the market to aid in the safe carriage of a long-arm been explored.

     

    NATIONAL FIREARMS AGREEMENT (NFA)

    Due to the Port Arthur Massacre in 1996, all sides of Government (Federal and State) agreed to the implementation of the NFA in 1996. The Monash University Shootings in 2002 reaffirmed the need to control handguns for community safety.

     

    The NFA constitutes a national approach to the regulation of firearms. The Agreement affirms that firearms possession and use, is a privilege that is conditional on the overriding need to ensure public safety, and that public safety is improved by the safe and responsible possession, carriage, use, registration, storage and transfer of firearms.

     

    In 2017 the Federal and all State Governments through the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) signed off on the update 2017 NFA. The 2017 NFA did not change Queensland’s approach to the licencing of category H firearms. Queensland Weapons Licensing continues to vary from the NFA in that, upon legislative requirements being met, it will still licence primary producers to possess a Category H firearm.

     

    APPLICABLE ANIMAL WELFARE GUIDELINES

    An Authorised Officer will also consider the following animal welfare guidelines which provide guidance on the suitability of types of firearms for humane destruction of livestock.

    The CSIRO provide the general “Model Code of Practice for the Welfare of Animals: Feral Livestock Animals”. A link to this code can be found at http://www.publish.csiro.au/book/370/

    More species-specific guidelines are put out by a section of the Federal Government known as PestSmart. There are guides for Dogs, Foxes, Rabbits, Pigs, Cats, Goats, Deer, Camels and Horses. A link to this site can be found at https://www.pestsmart.org.au/

    Each model code has specific requirements for the types of firearms and ammunition considered suitable for specific animals:

     

    PIG003Ground Shooting Feral Pigs - Large calibre, high-powered rifles (at least equal to .243 performance), fitted with a telescopic sight are recommended. Hollow-point or soft-nosed (minimum 80 grain) ammunition should be used.12-gauge shotguns with heavy shot sizes of SG or SSG, may be effective, but only up to a distance of 20 metres from the target animal.

     

    DOG003:Ground Shooting Wild Dogs - Small bore, high velocity, centre fire rifles fitted with a telescopic sight are preferred e.g. .22-250, .22 Hornet, .222 Remington, .223 or .243 Winchester. Hollow-point or soft nosed ammunition should always be used. • Rimfire weapons with lower muzzle energy are not recommended because of the greater risk of non-lethal wounding. • 12-gauge shotguns with heavy shot sizes of No. 2, SSG, BB or AAA may be effective, but only up to a distance of 20 metres from the target animal.

     

    Livestock – the humane killing of Livestock is covered by the QLD Government guidelines found on the Business and Industry portal called Humane Killing of Injured Livestock, it recommends a rifle for the destruction of livestock. A .22 or .22 magnum calibre rifle is adequate for most animals if the shot is correctly positioned. A link to this site can be located at https://www.business.qld.gov.au/industries/farms-fishingforestry/agriculture/livestock/animal-welfare/humane-killing

     

    Livestock Transportation – there is a specific Model Code of Practice for the Welfare of Animals: Land Transport of Cattle. it recommends rifle or captive bolt killers, not concealable firearms. Called Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines Land Transport of Livestock, (2012) and is available on online at http://www.animalwelfarestandards.net.au/files/2011/02/Land-transport-of-livestockStandards-and-Guidelines-Version-1.-1-21-September-2012.pdf

     

    Slaughter Yards– there is a specific model code of practice for the slaughter of livestock within a slaughtering establishment which recommends rifle or captive bolt killers, not concealable firearms. This is the Model Code of Practice for the Welfare of Animals: Livestock at Slaughtering Establishments, it is available on online at http://www.publish.csiro.au/book/2975/

     

    CARRIAGE OF FIREARMS OF MOTORBIKES AND HORSEBACK

    There are commercially available products for the carriage of long-arms on motorbikes and horses and the mere fact you use these methods to access parts of the property does not lead to the requirement for a handgun.

     

    Restrictions on the Type of Handguns in Queensland

     

    A holder of a concealable firearms licence, who is a member of an approved shooting club, must not use a weapon that:

    • has a calibre greater than .38 inch (except for black-powder pistols) unless they have applied for and been approved to use high calibre weapons,
    • is semi automatic and has a barrel length of less than 120mm unless it has an overall length of at least 250mm measured parallel to the barrel,
    • is not semi automatic (e.g. revolvers and single shot pistols) and has a barrel length of less than 100 mm unless it has an overall length of at least 250 mm measured parallel to the barrel,
    • has a capacity of more than 10 rounds, and
    • is designed to be used without a magazine that has a maximum capacity of more than 10 rounds.

    Calibre limitations do not apply to category H weapons that are black-powder pistols.

    A black-powder pistol is a firearm that is less than 75 cm in length; and is either:

    • a muzzle loading firearm; or
    • a cap and ball firearm; and
    • does not accept cartridge ammunition.

     

    IN CONCLUSION Queensland is one of the only States that continues to issue concealable licences to primary producers. Authorised Officers are still issuing licences for category H firearms to primary producers who have shown they meet the requirements. This information sheet is not to be construed as legal advice. Should you wish, please seek your own independent legal advice

     

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