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Firearms Licensing FAQ - Western Australia

 

This information is NOT legal advice, and is only provided as a guide. If you require case specific information please contact Police Firearms Licensing Branch directly on 1300 171 011.

 

Answer:
There is no minimum age to shoot a firearm in WA. Provided the person is shooting under the supervision and control of the guns licence holder. Strict control and supervision should be in place when teaching minors to shoot. Learning to keep the firearm pointed in the right direction and little fingers away from triggers are basic skills that if taught early will stick for a life-time of safe shooting.
Answer:
The minimum age for the issue of a firearm licence or permit for a firearm itself is 18 years old.  ( How young to get a gun licence? How old do I have to be to get a gun licence? At what age can I get a gun licence?)
Answer:
Answer 1)  Yes, you can shoot on private property, provided that you have written permission from the land owner and the land is of a suitable size for the calibre of firearm you are using. Remember to keep your firearms licence and letter of authority with you when you are out shooting. It is also adviseable to talk with adjacent land owners and let them know that there will be some noise for the day so as not to be alarmed. Remember to clean up after yourself and never leave rubbish and brass lying around. (Do I need permission to shoot on someones land? Can I shoot on a farm? Can I shoot on Crown Land?) Answer 2)  No you can't shoot on Crown Land - Section 267 (2)(h) of the Land Administration Act 1997 prohibits the discharge of any firearm or other weapon on Crown Land.
Answer:
There is not minimum for property size in the Firearms Act or Regulations in WA. If someone tries to tell you there is, I would suggest that they show you the section of the Act or Regulation that states this figure. Safety is the main issue here. You must take into consideration the size of the property, and the type of firearm you will be using.
.22 rimfire                              1.5 km
303                                         3.6 km
308                                         4 km
Air rifle                                   150 metres
Shotgun (#6 shot)                 250 metres
Shotgun (BB)                         450 metres

The distance that some rifles projectiles will travel is many kilometres. Google Maps can be helpful in determining property distances.
Answer:
Yes. Air rifles are considered to be firearms, just the same as ammunition is considered to be a firearm. Possession of ammunition without a licence or for the wrong calibre of ammunition is an offence and has harsh penalties.
Answer:
For the average shooter the answer is yes. (Refer to Section 8(i) of the Firearms Act 1973, which provides exemptions from licensing for family members and employees/contracted persons of Primary Producers).
Answer:
If your licence is less than 3 months over-due, you can usually contact Police Licensing to arrange payment. If you are over 3 months, you will need to apply for you licence again. Arrange for a gun dealer or gun club to store your firearms for a few months. Apply for a temporary movement permit and take the firearms to the dealer for storage. New serviceability form/s for the firearms will need to be obtained. The dealer will then add the firearms to their book while you re-apply for a firearms licence. Temporary Permits can be issued by the Police Licensing Department in Cannington Tel: (08) 9451 0000

Answer:
Yes, you will need to produce your Firearm Extract Card if seeking to purchase ammunition or if you are in possession of a firearm, along with your paper Firearm Licence.
Answer:
No. Because they are different licence types and allow for possession of firearms under separate circumstances, you must complete a separate application for each licence type.
Answer:
No. Categories A and B can be submitted on one application. Categories C, H and E applications are required to be submitted separately. Each application will incur a separate fee. For Category D applications, contact Licensing Services.
Answer:
No. Because they are different licence types and allow for possession of firearms under separate circumstances, you must complete a separate application for each licence type.
Answer:
No. Ducks are off the menu for hunters in Western Australia. It is not legal to go duck hunting.
Answer:
Western Australia does not automatically recognise firearm licences issued in other jurisdictions. Under Sections 17 and 17A of the Firearms Act 1973, visitors from interstate need to apply for a temporary permit in order to lawfully possess firearms registered elsewhere while in WA. This can either be done by contacting Licensing Services on 1300 171 011 prior to entering WA, by making application at the first available police station once inside WA. You are able to apply for a temporary permit for high powered firearms at a police station or by contacting Licensing Services directly. If you are a new resident in WA, you must make an application for a Firearm Licence and have your firearm stored at an ‘authorised’ facility pending the outcome of your application. Note: WA Police are under no obligation to grant a licence or permit..
Answer:
A Firearm Serviceability Certificate is required for each firearm you intend to licence. The certificate is required to ensure compliance with Sections 12 and 18(5) of the Firearms Act 1973 and Regulation 24 of the Firearms Regulations 1974. Certificates can only be issued by participating Clubs/Associations or licensed Firearm Dealers, Repairers or Manufacturers. It is the responsibility of the Seller to obtain the Serviceability Certificate, which remains valid for a period of 3 months.
Answer:
You can advertise your firearms for sale in public advertising columns however, it is preferred that the advertisement is through a recognised, registered firearm magazine or classifed advertising website.Remember to include the serial number of the firearm. Caution should be taken when supplying your address where the firearms are stored.
Answer:
Legislation decrees that it is the discretion of the Police Commissioner if an applicant is a fit and proper person to own a firearm. Every application is be subject to a probity check to consider if the person is a fit and proper person as decreed under legislation and the discretion of the Commissioner. (You can appeal this decision in the Courts - See Test Cases listed on Used Guns Mart
Answer:
If you wish to store your firearms for safekeeping for an extended period, you may make arrangements through a Firearms Dealer to store them at an approved warehouse. For extreme circumstance only, and at the discretion of the Officer in Charge of a Police Station, firearms may be stored at a police station on your behalf for a fee, however this will not be for any extended period.
Answer:
Yes, firearms legislation requires that Police be notified of the manner and date of disposal and should include details of the name/address of the person the firearm was disposed to. In the case of an acquisition of a firearm it is a requirement that all firearms in Western Australia be subject of a licence or permit unless an exemption exists. An application to licence a firearm will need to be made through a participating Australia Post outlet.
Answer:
The executor of the estate must hand the firearm/s into a local police station if the firearm/s are not licensed by any other person. If co-licensed, the firearm/s should be handed to the co-licensed person for safe-keeping pending the finalisation of the Estate matters being completed. The executor or administrator of an estate should advise police: • The name and contact details for the executor of the estate • The full name and date of birth of the deceased licence holder • The deceased’s Firearm Licence number (if known)

The executor must advise what is to happen with the firearm/s, be it disposal to a firearm dealer, forfeiture of the firearm for destruction or held pending outcome of the estate.
Answer:
Yes, Gel Blasters are illegal in WA at the present time. West Australian Police claim that Gel Blasters are illegal based on their interpretation of the firearms law. My personal opinion is that this may be open to a successful court appeal by anyone charged with possession of an Illegal Firearm (Gel Blaster).  There was a test case in Queensland under very similar laws that changed the interpretation of the law allowing Gel Blasters in Queensland. This is rather an involved topic, one which will need to be covered in a special article in the near future.
Answer:
No! Even in states where Gel Blasters are legal to own, you still can't walk around openly with them in a public place. This is why Gel Blasters are illegal to own in WA at the present time. These toys are very realistic to look at and are infact a firearm facsimile or imitation firearm. In the states where Gel Blasters are legal, you can't walk around with one in a public place without being charged with a serious criminal offence. 

       

 

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